FINANCE

Migrating Windows Small Business Server 2003 to New Hardware

If you decide that your server running the Windows® Small Business Server 2003 (Windows SBS) server software is no longer able to keep up with the demands of your organization, and expansion is not a viable option, you can use this guide to help you migrate the Windows SBS 2003 settings and data to new hardware.

By using the guide, you will learn how to install Windows SBS 2003 on a new computer, join the new computer to the existing Microsoft® Active Directory® directory services domain, and then migrate the Windows SBS 2003 settings and data from the old computer to the new computer. If you are migrating to a computer that has Windows SBS 2003 preinstalled by an original equipment manufacturer (OEM), you will be directed to reinstall Windows SBS 2003. You must have the Windows SBS 2003 discs to complete the migration process.

To prepare to migrate your existing server to new hardware, familiarize yourself with the following new terms and definitions and the process for completing a migration.

Migrating from an existing computer running Windows SBS 2003 to new hardware includes the following steps:

  1. Evaluate the current status of the source server.
  2. Install Windows SBS 2003 and join the domain.
  3. Transfer Exchange Server 2003 settings and folders.
  4. Migrate shared folders and data folders.
  5. Install and configure the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP).
  6. Configure Windows SBS 2003 settings.
  7. Migrate Internet Information Services (IIS) Web sites.
  8. Install and migrate Windows Server Update Services (WSUS).
  9. Migrate Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server settings.
  10. Migrate Microsoft SQL Server™ databases.
  11. Remove the source server from the network.

In this step, you can ensure a successful migration by completing the following tasks:

  • Collect information about the source server.
  • Verify that the hardware and software are compatible.
  • Install the most recent service packs.
  • Verify the health of the source server.
  • Plan for migrating line-of-business (LOB) applications.
  • Stop folder redirection on the source server.
  • Prepare ISA Server 2004 for migration.
  • Back up the source server.

It is highly recommended that the source server and the destination server run the latest service packs. The service packs listed in this section were used for the baseline testing of this document. Before installing a service pack, back up your server.

Important
You must install Service Pack 1 (SP1) for Windows SBS before you install Service Pack 2 (SP2) for Windows Server 2003 to ensure that the correct version of the .NET Framework is installed.

Ensure that the most recent service pack for Windows SBS 2003 is installed on your server.

  1. Start the Registry Editor, and then locate the following registry entry:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\SmallBusinesServer\ServicePackNumber

    The Data value should be 0x00000001.

  2. Install SP1 for Windows SBS 2003 if it is not installed. You can download SP1 for Windows SBS 2003 from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=46690).

Ensure that the most recent service pack for Windows Server 2003 is installed on your server.

Ensure that the most recent service pack for Exchange Server 2003 is installed on your server.

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    Note
    If Administrative Groups does not appear in the console pane, right-clickYourExchangeOrganization , click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, and then click OK twice.
  3. Expand Servers, right-click the server, and then click Properties.

  4. Install SP2 for Exchange Server 2003 if it is not installed. You can download SP2 for Exchange Server 2003 from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98933).

Ensure that the most recent service pack for Windows SharePoint® Services 2.0 is installed on your server.

  1. Click Start, point to Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.

  2. Click Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services 2.0, and then click Click here for support information.

    The version number for SP2 for Windows SharePoint Services 2.0 is 11.0.7969.0.

  3. Install SP2 for Windows SharePoint Services 2.0 if it is not installed. You can download SP2 for Windows SharePoint Services 2.0 from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=100179).

Before you proceed with Step 2, verify that ISA Server 2004 with Service Pack 3 (SP3) is installed. You can download SP3 for ISA Server 2004 from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=104551).

After you install and configure ISA Server 2004 with SP3, you must configure remote procedure call (RPC) filtering.

  1. To open ISA Server Management, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft ISA Server, and then click ISA Server Management.

  2. In the ISA Server Management console tree, expand Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2004, expandServerName , and then click Firewall Policy.

  3. In the details pane, click the SBS Protected Networks Access rule.

  4. On the Tasks tab, click Edit Selected Rule.

  5. On the Protocols tab (for an access rule), click Filtering, and then click Configure RPC Protocol.

  6. On the Protocol tab, clear the Enforce strict RPC compliance check box.

    Note
    When you disable the Enforce strict RPC compliance option, DCOM traffic and other RPC protocols are allowed.

In this step, you install Windows SBS 2003 and join the domain by completing the following tasks:

  • Start Windows SBS 2003 Setup on the destination server.
  • Join the destination server to the domain.
  • Install the DNS Server service on the destination server.
  • Promote the destination server to be a global catalog server.
  • Transfer the operations master roles to the destination server.
  • Move the site licensing server to the destination server.
  • Change the DNS server addresses to point to the destination server.
  • Verify that Active Directory objects are replicated on the destination server
  • Back up the Windows SharePoint Services database on the source server.
  • Continue Windows SBS 2003 Setup.
  • Restore the Windows SharePoint Services database on the destination server.

To start the installation process, perform the actions listed in "Step 1: Windows Installation" of Chapter 3A "New Installation" in Getting Started, which is at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).

When prompted for the computer name, you must use a standard computer name that is not used by another computer on the network. A standard computer name is a unique name of up to 15 standard characters, which include A–Z, 0–9, and the hyphen (-). The name of the source server and the name of the destination server must be different. After the migration, it is not possible to change the name of the destination server.

Important
Do not continue with "Step 2: Windows Configuration" in Getting Started until later. In the Continuing Microsoft Small Business Server Setup dialog box, click Cancel.

Before you continue with the migration process, you must add a static IP address for the destination server and add the DNS server address for the source server to the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) properties of the network adapter on the destination server.

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Control Panel, point to Network Connections, right-click the network connection for the local area network, and then click Properties.

  2. Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.

  3. Click Use the following IP address, and then type the static IP address of the destination server.

  4. Click Use the following DNS addresses, and then type the DNS server address of the source server.

  5. Click OK twice.

Ensure that SP2 for Windows Server 2003 is installed. For more information about installing service packs, see Install the most recent service packs earlier in this document.

Windows Firewall is turned on by Windows SBS 2003 Setup, and you must turn off Windows Firewall on the destination server for the migration process to be successful.

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Control Panel, point to Network Connections, right-click the network connection for the local area network, and then click Properties.

  2. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Settings.

  3. Click Off, and then click OK.

The destination server must hold the operations master roles before Windows SBS 2003 Setup can continue. The following table lists the operations master roles that you will transfer to the destination server.

Operations Master Role Description

Schema Master

Controls all updates and modifications to the schema.

Domain Naming Master

Controls the addition or removal of domains in the forest.

Infrastructure Master

Responsible for updating references from objects in its domain to objects in other domains.

Relative ID (RID) Master

Responsible for processing RID pool requests from all domain controllers in a particular domain.

Primary Domain Controller (PDC) Emulator

Enables a domain controller to act as the primary domain controller for workstations, member servers, and domain controllers that are running earlier versions of Windows.

Before you can transfer operations master roles, you must connect Active Directory Users and Computers to the domain controller on the destination server.

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Users and Computers.

  2. Right-click your Active Directory domain, and then click Connect to Domain Controller.

  3. In the Available Domain Controller box, click the domain controller for the destination server, and then click OK.

After you connect to the domain controller on the destination server, you can transfer the RID master role.

  1. With Active Directory Users and Computers open, right-click your Active Directory domain, and then click Operations Master.

  2. Click the RID tab, and then click Change.

  3. Click Yes to confirm that you want to transfer the role, and then click OK.

While the Operations Master dialog box is open, you can transfer the PDC Emulator role.

  1. In the Operations Master dialog box, click the PDC tab, and then click Change.

  2. Click Yes to confirm that you want to transfer the role, and then click OK.

And finally, in the Operations Master dialog box, you can transfer the Infrastructure Master role.

  1. In the Operations Master dialog box, click the Infrastructure tab, and then click Change.

    Note
    You will be informed that the infrastructure operations master role should not be transferred to a global catalog server. You can ignore this message because it is not applicable to Windows SBS 2003.
  2. Click Yes to confirm that you want to transfer the role, and then click OK.

  3. Click Close.

In Active Directory Domains and Trusts, you will transfer the Domain Naming Master role.

  1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Domains and Trusts.

  2. Right-click Active Directory Domains and Trusts, and then click Connect to Domain Controller.

  3. In the Available Domain Controller list, click the domain controller for the destination server, and then click OK.

  4. In the console pane of the Active Directory Domains and Trusts window, right-click Active Directory Domains and Trusts, and then click Operations Master.

  5. In the Change Operations Master dialog box, click Change.

  6. Click Yes to confirm that you want to transfer the role, and then click OK.

  7. Click Close.

You will use the Schema Master Tool to transfer the Schema Master role.

  1. You must register the Schema Master Tool as a Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in before you can use it to transfer the role. To register the Schema Master Tool, click Start, click Run, type regsvr32 schmmgmt.dll, and then click OK twice.

  2. Click Start, click Run, type mmc, and then click OK.

  3. Click File, and then click Add/Remove Snap-in.

  4. Click Add.

  5. Click Active Directory Schema, click Add, and then click Close.

  6. In the Add/Remove Snap-in dialog box, click OK.

  7. Select Active Directory Schema, right-click Active Directory Schema, and then click Change Domain Controller.

  8. Under Select DC, click Specify Name, type the name of the destination server, and then click OK.

  9. Right-click Active Directory Schema, and then click Operations Master.

  10. In the Change Schema Master dialog box, click Change.

  11. Click Yes, click OK, and then click Close.

You can use the /v switch for dcdiag.exe to determine that the operations master roles were successfully transferred.

Before you can continue with the setup process, you must wait for the Active Directory objects to replicate on the destination server. The time this takes depends on the size of AD DS and on network performance. Windows SBS 2003 Setup will not continue if replication is not finished or if it has failed.

If you want to see if the objects are replicating properly, you can create a new test user on the source server, and then after several minutes, confirm that the object has replicated to the destination server.

You can perform the following procedure to force replication from a source server.

  1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Sites and Services.

  2. In the console pane, expand Default-First-Site-Name, expand Servers, and then expand the server.

  3. Click NTDS Settings. One or more objects are listed in the details pane. One of those objects is a link to the domain controller that you want to replicate. Right-click this domain controller, and then click Replicate Now. The replication is performed immediately.

When you complete Windows SBS 2003 Setup, the DNS record for http://companyweb points to the database on the destination server. Before users start adding or modifying information that is stored in the database on the destination server, you need to stop access to the database on the source server, back up the database on the source server, and then after the setup process is complete, use the backup to restore http://companyweb on the destination server.

By setting the database to Read Only, you can stop users from uploading information to http://companyweb folders while the database is being backed up.

  1. On the source server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  2. At the command prompt, type:

    osql –E –S %computername%\Sharepoint

  3. At the first Osql prompt, type:

    sp_dboption "DatabaseName", "Read Only", TRUE

    ( DatabaseNameis the name of the database that is used to support http://companyweb. The default name for a Windows SBS 2003 database is STS_ ServerName _1. The quotation marks are required.)

  4. At the second Osql prompt, type

    go

  5. Type exit.

Before you complete Windows SBS 2003 Setup, you must back up the Windows SharePoint Services database. The backup file that you create will be used immediately after the setup process is complete to restore the database on the destination server.

  1. On the source server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  2. At the command prompt, type the following command, and then press Enter:

    cd %drive%\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\web server extensions\60\BIN

  3. At the command prompt, type the following command, and then press Enter:

    stsadm -o backup -url http://companyweb -filename BackupPath

    ( BackupPathis the path of the backup file that you will use to restore the database on the destination server.)

Note
You can also use smigrate.exe to back up and restore your Windows SharePoint Services database. Smigrate.exe is located in the same folder as stsadm.exe. For more information about running smigrate.exe, change the directory to %drive%\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\web server extensions\60\BIN, and then type smigrate /?.

If you have additional sites that are not included in http://companyweb, you must also back up those sites before you continue the setup process.

After joining the destination server to the domain, installing and configuring the DNS Server service, transferring the operations master roles, and transferring the site license server, you must complete the Windows SBS 2003 setup process.

The following information should be considered when you complete the Windows SBS 2003 setup process:

  • The network can support only one DHCP server. Setup will detect the DHCP server on the source server and recommend that you disable the existing DHCP server and install the DHCP server on the destination server. You must click No in the Setup dialog box because you will install and configure DHCP later in the migration process.
  • When prompted for an IP address, do not change it from the static IP address that was entered earlier in the migration process.
  • Ensure that the full DNS name for the internal domain and the NetBIOS domain name are the same for the destination server and the source server. If the full DNS name or the NetBIOS domain name for the source server and destination server are the different, the migration will fail.
  • When you enter the full DNS name for your internal domain, your NetBIOS domain name, the IP address of your local network adapter, and your built-in Administrator account name and password, refer to the information that you collected in “Worksheet 1: Source and Destination Computer Information.”

  1. On the desktop of the destination server, double-click Continue Setup, and then click Next.

  2. In the Setup Requirements dialog box, you will be notified that the Directory Services Restore Mode password will be changed and that you must remove the source server from the network when the migration process is complete. Select I acknowledge all warnings, and then click Next.

  3. Complete the remainder of the setup process by performing the actions listed in "Step 2: Windows Configuration" of Chapter 3A "New Installation" in Getting Started, at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).

Before you perform the remaining tasks in this document, you should ensure that the most recent service packs are installed on the destination server. For more information about installing service packs, see Install the most recent service packs earlier in this document.

In this step, you transfer Exchange Server 2003 settings and folders to the destination server by completing the following tasks:

  • Verify the integrity of the Exchange Server 2003 database.
  • Replicate all public folders and system folders to the destination server.
  • Replicate the Offline Address Book folder to the destination server.
  • Change the server that is responsible for generating the Offline Address List.
  • Replicate the Schedule+ Free Busy folder to the destination server.
  • Replicate the Organization Forms folder to the destination server.
  • Reassign the Recipient Update Service (RUS) to the destination server.
  • Designate the destination server as the routing group master.
  • Transfer the settings for the Exchange Server 2003 connectors to the destination server.
  • Transfer the settings for the Intelligent Message Filter to the destination server.
  • Move Exchange Server 2003 mailboxes to the destination server.
  • Move Exchange Server 2003 message tracking logs to the destination server.

Before performing the following tasks to transfer Exchange Server 2003 settings, you should ensure that the most recent service pack for Exchange Server 2003 is installed on the destination server. For more information about installing service packs, see Install the most recent service packs earlier in this document.

To ensure that all of the latest data in the public folders on the source server is located on the destination server, you must create replicas on the destination server of all public folders that are located on the source server.

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    Note
    If Administrative Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-clickYourExchangeOrganization , click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, and then click OK twice.
  3. Expand Folders, and then expand Public Folders.

    Note
    After you join the destination server to the domain, duplicate folders exist for your organization's Archive folder and Contacts folder. You only need to create replicas of the Archive folder and Contacts folder that previously existed on the source server. You can determine the folders that previously existed on your source server by opening the Properties dialog box and viewing the Public Folder Store. The Public Folder Store for the original folders reference the source server, not the destination server.
  4. If the folder does not contain subfolders, you can create a replica of the folder by performing the following tasks:

    1. Right click the folder, and then click Properties.
    2. Click the Replication tab, and then click Add.
    3. Select the destination server, and then click OK.
    4. Click Apply, and then click OK.
  5. If the folder contains subfolders, you can create a replica of the top-level folder and all of its subfolders by performing the following tasks:

    1. Right-click the top-level folder, point to All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.
    2. In the Manage Public Folder Settings Wizard, click Next.
    3. Click Modify lists of replica servers, and then click Next.
    4. Select Add servers, and then click Next.
    5. In the servers list, select the destination server, click Next, and then click Finish.
  6. Repeat step 4 or 5 for all of the folders that you want to replicate.

  7. After replicas have been created on the destination server, you must ensure that the replica folders are synchronized with the source folders. Perform the following steps to ensure that replica folders are synchronized:

    1. In the console pane, click the public folder that you want to verify.
    2. In the details pane, click the Replication tab.
    3. When replication is complete, In Sync is displayed in the Replication Status column.
  8. After you have confirmed that each folder has been replicated, you must remove the replica from the source server. If the folder does not contain any subfolders, perform the following steps to remove the replica:

    1. Right click the folder, and then click Properties.
    2. Click Replication, select the Public Folder Store that represents the source server, and then click Remove.
    3. Click Apply, and then click OK.
  9. To remove a replica from a folder on the source server that contains subfolders, perform the following steps:

    1. Right-click the top-level folder, point to All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.
    2. In the Manage Public Folder Settings Wizard, click Next.
    3. Click Modify lists of replica servers, and then click Next.
    4. Click Remove servers, and then click Next.
    5. Select the source server, click Next, and then click Finish.
  10. Repeat step 8 or 9 for all folders that were replicated.

Users who work offline must download Offline Address Lists to obtain information about other users in their organization. When an administrator creates an Offline Address Book, the address list is converted to a separate set of files and stored in an Exchange Server 2003 public folder. You must create a replica of this folder on the destination server.

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    Note
    If Administrative Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-clickYourExchangeOrganization , click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, and then click OK twice.
  3. Expand Folders, right-click Public Folders, and then click View System Folders.

    Note
    If you do not see a View System Folders option, you are currently viewing the system folders.
  4. Expand Offline Address Book, and then perform the following tasks:

    1. Right-click /o= YourExchangeOrganization /cn=addrlists/cn=oabs/cn=Default Offline Address List, point to All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.
    2. In the Manage Public Folder Settings Wizard, click Next.
    3. Click

      Modify lists of replica servers, and then click Next.

    4. Select Add servers, and then click Next.
    5. In the servers list, select the destination server, click Next, and then click Finish.
  5. After replicas have been created on the destination server, you must ensure that the replica folders are synchronized with the source folders. Perform the following steps to ensure that replica folders are synchronized:

    1. In the console pane, click the public folder that you want to verify.
    2. In the details pane, click the Replication tab.
    3. When replication is complete, In Sync is displayed in the Replication Status column.
  6. After you have confirmed that each folder has been replicated, you must remove the replica from the source server. Perform the following steps to remove the replica:

    1. Right-click /o= YourExchangeOrganization /cn=addrlists/cn=oabs/cn=Default Offline Address List, point to All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.
    2. In the Manage Public Folder Settings Wizard, click Next.
    3. Click Modify lists of replica servers, and then click Next.
    4. Select Remove servers, and then click Next.
    5. In the servers list, select the source server, click Next, and then click Finish.

The Schedule+ Free Busy folder contains free or busy data that represents a user's personal availability based on the user's schedule. You must create a replica of this folder on the destination server.

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    Note
    If Administrative Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-clickYourExchangeOrganization , click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, and then click OK twice.
  3. Expand Folders, right-click Public Folders, and then click View System Folders.

    Note
    If you do not see a View System Folders option, you are currently viewing system folders.
  4. Expand Schedule+ Free Busy, right-click EX:/o= YourExchangeOrganization /ou=first administrative group, and then click Properties.

  5. Click the Replication tab, and then click Add.

  6. In the Select a Public Store box, select the destination server, and then click OK.

  7. Click Apply, and then click OK.

  8. Repeat steps 4 through 7 for all administrative group folders that you want to replicate.

  9. After replicas have been made on the destination server, ensure that the replica folders are synchronized with the source folders. Perform the following steps to ensure that replica folders are synchronized.

    1. In the console pane, click the public folder that you want to verify.
    2. In the details pane, click the Replication tab.
    3. When replication has completed, In Sync is displayed in the Replication Status column.
  10. After you have confirmed that each folder has been replicated, you must remove the replica from the source server. Perform the following steps to remove the replica.

    1. Expand Public Folders, right-click EX:/o= YourExchangeOrganization /ou=first administrative group, and then click Properties.
    2. Click the Replication tab.
    3. In the Replicate content to these public stores list, click the name of the Public Folder Store that represents the source server, click Remove, click Apply, and then click OK.
  11. Repeat step 10 for all folders that were replicated.

The Organization Forms folder contains forms for Outlook e-mail messages that are used by everyone. If the source server has the only Organization Forms folder, you must create a replica of the Organization Forms folder on the destination server. If you do not create a replica of this folder, client computers might stop responding when they send non-delivery report (NDR) messages and read-receipt messages.

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    Note
    If Administrative Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-clickYourExchangeOrganization , click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, and then click OK twice.
  3. Expand Folders, right-click Public Folders, and then click View System Folders.

    Note
    If you do not see a View System Folders option, you are currently viewing system folders.
  4. Expand the EFORMS REGISTRY folder. If an Organization Forms folder exists, it appears as a subfolder to the EFORMS REGISTRY folder.

    If an Organization Forms folder does not exist, do not complete the following steps in this procedure.

  5. Right-click theYourOrganizationFormsfolder, and then click Properties.

    Note
    If you receive a message that the mail proxy for this folder was not found, click OK.
  6. Add a replica of this folder to the destination server, ensure that replication is complete, and then remove the replica.

    For more information about how to add a replica of this folder to the destination server, see Replicate all Exchange Server 2003 public folders to the destination server earlier in this document.

The Recipient Update Service (RUS) is responsible for updating address lists and e-mail addresses in AD DS. When Windows SBS 2003 is installed, two RUS instances are created, one for the domain and one for the enterprise configuration. You must reassign both instances of RUS to the destination server.

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Recipients, and then click Recipient Update Services.

  3. Right-click the Recipient Update Service that is hosted on the source server, and then click Properties.

  4. On the General tab (next to Exchange server), click Browse.

  5. Type the name of the destination server in the Enter the object name to select text box, and then click Check Names.

  6. If the name that you entered is correct, click OK.

  7. On the General tab (next to Windows Domain Controller), click Browse.

  8. Type the name of the destination server in the Enter the object name to select text box, and then click Check Names.

  9. If the name that you entered is correct, click OK.

  10. In the Recipient Update Services Properties dialog box, click OK.

  11. Repeat steps 3 through 10 for each RUS instance that is hosted on the source server.

The settings for the Exchange Server 2003 connectors do not replicate to the destination server when the server is joined to the domain. You can use the information in “Worksheet 2: SMTP Connector Settings,” to configure the SMTP connector on the destination server.

You can transfer the settings for the POP3 connector by copying the files that are used to store the settings from the source server to the destination server.

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Routing Groups, and then expand First routing group.

    Note
    If Routing Groups is not displayed in the console pane, right-clickYourExchangeOrganization , click Properties, select the Display routing groups check box, and then click OK twice. If Administrative Groups is displayed, Routing Groups will be located under Administrative Groups.
  3. Expand Connectors, right-click SmallBusiness SMTP connector, and then click Properties.

  4. Use the information from Worksheet 2 to configure the connector.

To transfer the settings for the POP3 connector, you can copy the files that are used to store the POP3 connector configuration from the source server to the destination server. The files are IMBData.dat and IMBData.bak, and they are in %drive%\Program Files\Microsoft Windows Small Business Server\Networking\POP3.

A worksheet titled “Required Information for Connecting to the Internet” is available in Appendix A of Getting Started at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122). This worksheet explains how to record the POP3 mailbox information. You can use the recorded information to verify that the POP3 connector files were correctly installed on the destination server.

You must move all user mailboxes and the Administrator mailbox to the destination server before you remove Exchange Server 2003 from the source server. The SMTP mailbox, System Attendant mailbox, and the SystemMailbox mailbox are not moved.

  1. On the source server, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.

  2. Expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First administrative group.

    Note
    If Administrative Groups does not appear in the console pane, right-clickYourExchangeOrganization , click Properties, select the Display administrative groups check box, click OK twice, and then restart the Exchange System Manager.
  3. Expand Servers, expand the source server, expand First Storage Group, expand Mailbox Store, and then click Mailboxes.

  4. In the details pane, select the mailboxes that you want to move. You can press CTRL and select multiple mailboxes.

  5. Right-click the selected mailboxes, and then click Exchange Tasks.

  6. In the Exchange Task Wizard, click Next.

  7. In the Select a task to perform list, click Move Mailbox, and then click Next.

  8. For the type of move, accept the default of Same Administrative Group Move, and then click Next.

  9. In the Server box, click the destination server.

  10. In the Mailbox Store box, click the Mailbox Store for the destination server.

  11. Click Next.

  12. Configure how you want to handle corrupted messages that are found during the move, and then click Next.

  13. Accept the current date and time in the Begin processing tasks at box to begin the move immediately, and then click Next.

  14. The Task Summary page shows the status of the move operation. Click Finish.

For more information about moving mailboxes, search for article 821829, “Moving Mailboxes in Exchange Server 2003” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20167).

In this step, you copy shared folders and data folders to the destination server by performing the following tasks:

  • Copy Users Shared Folders to the destination server.
  • Copy additional shared folders, LOB application folders, and general user data folders to the destination server.

Only one DHCP Server service can be active in the Windows SBS 2003 network. The responsibility for managing DHCP must be transferred from the source server to the destination server. In this step, you install and configure DHCP on the destination server by completing the following tasks:

  • Back up DHCP settings on the source server.
  • Disable DHCP on the source server.
  • Install DHCP on the destination server.
  • Migrate DHCP settings to the destination server.
  • Change the DHCP scope options on the destination server.
Note
Skip these procedures if you have a router device that provides the DHCP Server service to the local network and you plan to continue using this device as your DHCP server. Ensure that your router is connected to the destination server during Windows SBS 2003 Setup so that DHCP is properly configured on the destination server. For more information, see Appendix C of Getting Started at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).

In this step, you configure Windows SBS 2003 settings by completing the following tasks using the To Do List in Server Management:

  • Configure the e-mail and Internet connection.
  • Configure Remote Access.
  • Add a printer.
  • Configure Fax.
  • Configure Backup.
  • Transfer client access licenses to the destination server.

You can use “Worksheet 5: Windows SBS 2003 Settings” to complete the procedures in this step.

If you purchased additional CALs, you must transfer them from the source server to the destination server. Before you transfer CALs to the destination server, you must activate Windows SBS 2003 for the destination server, and because you are transferring licenses you must use the telephone method of activation.

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to All Programs, and then click Activate Windows.

  2. In Windows Product Activation, select Yes, I want to telephone a customer service representative to activate Windows.

  3. After you select the appropriate location, you are provided with a telephone number and an installation ID that you can give to the customer service representative to complete the activation process.

After you activate Windows SBS 2003 on the destination server, you can transfer the CALs.

  1. On the destination server, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Licensing. Details about your currently installed CALs appear in the details pane.

  2. In the details pane, click Transfer Licenses to open the Transfer Licenses Wizard, and then follow the wizard instructions.

  3. After completing the wizard, refresh the Licensing console to verify the successful transfer of your CALs.

For more information about transferring CALs, see "Compilation of Activation and Client Access Licensing Help" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=46577).

In this step, you use the Internet Information Services (IIS) 6.0 Migration Tool to migrate from the source server to the destination server any custom Web sites that were configured with IIS. The IIS 6.0 Migration Tool and its accompanying user documentation are included in the IIS 6.0 Resource Kit Tools, which can be downloaded from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20161).

Note
The IIS 6.0 Migration Tool cannot be used on a source or destination server that is running IIS 6.0 in IIS 5.0 Isolation mode. Your source and destination servers must be running IIS 6.0 in Worker Process Isolation mode.

  1. After you install the IIS 6.0 Migration Tool, on the destination server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  2. Locate the directory where you installed the IIS 6.0 Migration Tool, and then at the command prompt type:

    iismt SourceServerName WebSiteName

    ( WebSiteNameis the name that appears in the Web Sites folder in the Internet Information Services Manager.)

  3. Verify that the Web site successfully migrated to the destination server. You can use the log file that was created by the IIS 6.0 Migration Tool to resolve errors. The log file is located in the folder %systemroot%\System32\LogFiles\IISMT\.

  4. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for all Web sites that you want to migrate.

Some Web sites and applications have content that is not located in the home directory of the Web site or in the subdirectories of the home directory. The IIS 6.0 Migration Tool only migrates Web site content from the following locations:

  • Within the home directory and subdirectories of the Web site.
  • In virtual directories with disk volume letters that exist on both the source server and the destination server.

If the code in your applications directly references content that is located outside of the home directory and subdirectories of the Web site, or if a virtual directory is stored on a disk volume letter that does not exist on the destination server, you must migrate this Web site content manually.

For more information about migrating Web sites by using the IIS 6.0 Migration Tool, see "Migrating IIS Web Sites to IIS 6.0" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98936).

In this step, you install and migrate Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) by performing the following tasks:

  • Export WSUS update metadata from the source server.
  • Export WSUS configuration settings from the source server.
  • Install WSUS on the destination server.
  • Import WSUS update metadata to the destination server.
  • Import WSUS configuration settings to the destination server.

The tools that are used to migrate WSUS settings are included in the WSUS installation directory and in the Windows Server Update Services API Samples and Tools. You can download these tools from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=93830).

Note
WSUS 2.0 is installed by Windows SBS 2003 R2 Setup. If you have upgraded from WSUS 2.0 to WSUS 3.0 on the source server, you need to upgrade to WSUS 3.0 on the destination server after you complete Windows SBS 2003 R2 Setup. If you have upgraded to WSUS 3.0, you must use Windows Server Update Services API Samples and Tools for WSUS 3.0 to migrate WSUS 3.0 settings. You can download the tools from the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=96138).

The following table lists the tools that are used to migrate WSUS settings.

Tool Description

wsusutil.exe

Used to export and import update metadata to and from a package file.

For more information about wsusutil.exe, see "Managing WSUS from the Command Line" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98938).

WSUSMigrationExport.exe

Used to export the following WSUS settings:

  • Configuration
  • Computers
  • Target groups
  • Approvals

WSUSMigrationImport.exe

Used to import the settings that were exported with WSUSMigrationExport.exe.

If your source server is running Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server, you must export the ISA Server configuration settings from the source server, install ISA Server on the destination server, and then import the ISA Server configuration settings to the destination server.

For more information about exporting and importing ISA Server configuration settings, see "Export, Import, and Backup Functionality in ISA Server 2004" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=99046).

If you use SQL Server databases on the source server to support LOB applications, you must migrate your SQL Server databases to the destination server.

Note
You should contact your LOB application provider for information related to migrating SQL Server databases that are used with LOB applications.

Search for article 314546, “How to: Move Databases Between Computers that Are Running SQL Server” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20167), and then follow the instructions in the article.

You can have only one server that is running Windows SBS 2003 on your network, and serving as the domain controller. You have seven days from when you join the destination server to the domain before the source server must be removed from the network. In this step, you remove the source server from the network by performing the following tasks:

  • Start Folder Redirection on the destination server.
  • Share data folders and set permissions on the destination server.
  • Remove Exchange Server 2003 from the source server.
  • Prepare the client computers.
  • Configure the firewall ports on the router.
  • Update the logon scripts.
  • Demote the source server.
  • Retire the source server.
  • Create an alias that maps the source server name to the destination server name.

The shared folders that existed on the source server are not migrated, and you must manually create them on the destination server. Before you share the folders on the destination server, you must choose to not share the folder on the source server, and you must ensure that all recent data has been copied to the folders that will be shared.

Important
Before you continue with the procedures in this section, ensure that you have recorded the information for the shared folders and the permissions that have been assigned to them in "Worksheet 6: Shared Folder Information."

  1. On the source server, use Windows Explorer to browse to the location of the shared folder.

  2. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.

  3. On the Sharing tab, click Do not share this folder.

  4. Click Apply, and then click OK.

  5. Repeat steps 1 through 4 for all shared folders.

In the time that has elapsed since folders were copied to the destination server, new data has possibly been added to the folders on the source server. To ensure that all recent data exists on the destination server, you must rerun the Xcopy commands that you ran in "Step 4: Migrate Shared Folders and Data Folders." Use the /d parameter to instruct the Xcopy command to only copy files that have a source time that is newer than the destination time.

After you choose to not share folders on the source server and copy the latest data to the destination server, you can share the folders to the destination server.

Note
Use the information that you recorded in "Worksheet 6: Shared Folder Information" to share folders and set permissions on the destination server.

  1. On the destination server, use Windows Explorer to browse to the location of the folder.

  2. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.

  3. On the Sharing tab, click Share this folder.

  4. Click Permissions, and then set the permissions according to those that were recorded for the folder in "Worksheet 6: Shared Folder Information."

  5. In the Share Permissions dialog box, click Apply, and then click OK.

  6. In the Share Properties dialog box, click Apply, and then click OK.

  7. Repeat steps 1 through 6 for all shared folders.

To facilitate the appropriate communication between client computers and the destination server, you must create an alias that maps the source server name to the destination server name.

  1. Raise the domain functional level of the destination server to Windows Server 2003, if necessary.

    For information about how to raise the domain function level, see “Raise the domain functional level” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=141249).

  2. On the destination server, click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

  3. At the command prompt, type:

    netdom computername DestinationServerName /add:SourceServerName.DomainName.local

    ( SourceServerName.DomainName .local is the FQDN of the source server.)

    For more information about using netdom.exe, see "Netdom Overview" at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=98942).

  4. Using the alias that you created, add an entry to the registry to allow SMB connections.

Caution
Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up valued data from the computer.

  1. Start Registry Editor and locate the following registry entry:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\lanmanserver\parameters

  2. Right-click parameters, point to New, and then click DWORD Value.

  3. Type DisableStrictNameChecking in the Name column, and then press Enter.

  4. Right-click the DisableStrictNameChecking DWORD value, and then click Modify.

  5. In the Value data box, type 1, and then click OK.

  6. On the File menu, click Exit.

  7. Restart the server.

If you are using a UPnP™ certified router, you can use the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard to configure the firewall ports on the router that are used by Windows SBS 2003. If you are not using a UPnP certified router, you must manually configure the firewall ports.

  1. On the destination server, click Start, and then click Server Management.

  2. In the console pane, click To Do List.

  3. In the details pane, click Connect to the Internet.

  4. Click Next, and then click Yes. The ports will be configured based on the selections that you make in the next steps of the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard.

  5. Complete the remaining steps in the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard.

The ports on some UPnP certified routers might not be configured correctly by using the Configure E-mail and Internet Connection Wizard, and some routers are not UPnP certified. For these routers, you must manually configure the ports.

To manually configure the ports, refer to the documentation for your router and to "Configuration Settings for an Existing Firewall Device" in Appendix A of Getting Started, at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).

For more information, see the following resources:

  • For a copy of Getting Started, see the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20122).
  • For more information about the Exchange Migration Wizard, search for article 328871, “How to: Use the Exchange Migration Wizard to Migrate Mailboxes from an Exchange Organization” at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20167). In the article, disregard any information about creating a trust, because this is not necessary for migrating to Windows SBS 2003.
  • For information about troubleshooting migrations, see the Windows SBS 2003 Troubleshooting document at the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=20282).
  • For the most recent information about Windows SBS 2003, see the Windows Small Business Server Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=16918).


Category: Small business

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